Children’s Tylenol Recalled

This Newsday article claims that the McNeil unit of Johnson & Johnson has voluntarily recalled 57 lots of infants and children’s liquid Tylenol products due to the possibility of bacterial contamination. The Tylenol products manufactured between April and June 2009 included almost two dozen varieties subject to the recall. Johnson & Johnson has said publicly that an inactive ingredient in the various types of product did not meet the company’s internal testing requirements and B. cepacia bacteria was found in a part of the unused material.

The company composed a letter that stated they found no bacteria in the finished product sold to the public, and the possibility of someone becoming seriously ill from contamination of their product was very remote. However, after a consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, the company decided that they would recall the products.

“It was decided, as a precaution, to recall all products that utilized any of the raw material manufactured at the same time as the raw material that tested positive for the bacteria,” the company said.

A spokesperson with the FDA said that the agency was working closely with the company to monitor the products. Lot numbers for these Tylenol products are on the bottom of the product’s box and on the sticker that surrounds the product’s bottle. B. cepacia infections could result in serious illness for people with existing pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis or compromised immune systems.

If you or someone you care for has suffered illness or injury due to a recalled product, contact the Law Offices of Los Angeles product recall attorney Samer Habbas today to schedule a free consultation to see if you may have a legal recourse.

This Newsday article claims that the McNeil unit of Johnson & Johnson has voluntarily recalled 57 lots of infants and children’s liquid Tylenol products due to the possibility of bacterial contamination. The Tylenol products manufactured between April and June 2009 included almost two dozen varieties subject to the recall. Johnson & Johnson has said publicly that an inactive ingredient in the various types of product did not meet the company’s internal testing requirements and B. cepacia bacteria was found in a part of the unused material.

The company composed a letter that stated they found no bacteria in the finished product sold to the public, and the possibility of someone becoming seriously ill from contamination of their product was very remote. However, after a consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, the company decided that they would recall the products.

“It was decided, as a precaution, to recall all products that utilized any of the raw material manufactured at the same time as the raw material that tested positive for the bacteria,” the company said.

A spokesperson with the FDA said that the agency was working closely with the company to monitor the products. Lot numbers for these Tylenol products are on the bottom of the product’s box and on the sticker that surrounds the product’s bottle. B. cepacia infections could result in serious illness for people with existing pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis or compromised immune systems.

If you or someone you care for has suffered illness or injury due to a recalled product, contact the Law Offices of Los Angeles product recall attorney Samer Habbas today to schedule a free consultation to see if you may have a legal recourse.

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